HAS BOOK (Shield of Sea and Space Release Day)

Happy Tuesday, everyone! And it is happy indeed, being May 7th and therefore Shield of Sea and Space‘s release day.
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I’ve just returned from Portland, where I met 250 (!) totally amazing young people who had built games at the Oregon Game Project Challenge. It was an extremely moving, exciting event, and I hope to be involved more in the future. Portland was feeling the love, and the same weekend a really fantastic 4.5 star review was published in the Portland Book Review:

Overall, this final installment ends the story exactly how it should: with bravery, passion and a few tears. This is a wonderful trilogy and sci-fi fans who haven’t yet read it are definitely missing out.

 
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!!!!GIVEAWAY!!!!
To celebrate, I am giving away a little wolf-colored Windstone griffin chick along with a signed copy of the book. There will be more giveaways as the summer goes on. Just comment here or share this post on facebook to be entered to win!
/!!!!GIVEAWAY!!!!


 
 
 
 
 
 
This year, Mac the Super Dachshund is emcee of the unboxing: shield-unboxing

It’s been a phenomenal road that still manages to feel just a bit unreal even after all these years. I’ll have more thoughts on ending a trilogy another time, but for now, I am humbled, grateful, and once again knocked over by the tremendous production staff at Pyr and what they have made with my work.

Andovar has been with me a long time, in various shapes and sizes. The first incarnation of the world was born in 1995, and here we are eighteen years later with a completed trilogy that is itself just the beginning of a world of stories. In one of the many odd little coincidences that have popped up lately, Jeremy Soule, composer of Skyrim (as well as Oblivion, Neverwinter Nights and more), whose kickstarter I chipped into a couple of months ago, posted today about completing the first movement of a work that had been with him for eighteen years. The brevity of his description resonates; words are for once inadequate.

I am full of thankfulness for the world and for all of you.

Determined to foment a rebellion 2008-06-17 18:39:22

So, I am sitting here in my silk kimono robe (don’t get too excited, I’m also wearing a t-shirt and jeans) and my slippers and I’m feeling very writerly. It’s a nice feeling considering that over the past few days I’ve been going through one of those crises of conscience about what constitutes “important” writing (thanks, Time book). But now I have to go buy groceries. It’s a glamorous existence.

Sometimes, though, there is praise. The writing life is enough of a persistent beatdown that I am always shocked when this happens.

First, Kieron Gillen enjoyed “Slave to the Beat”, which went up a week ago and I kind of forgot to tell you folks about (oops):

Erin Hoffman writes about Audition Online for the Escapist. I’ve played a little of this MMO rhythm action game, and went away a tad depressed, but Erin goes completely native in an entertaining fashion. I’m probably alone in my wish for an actual game-of-the-film Audition though, in a kirri-kirri-kirri kind of way.

Kieron recently made yet another top-game-journalists list; he’s certainly one of the better guys working in the field, so anything from him feels like high praise while I trudge along as a sort of confused non-game-journalist.

And Alvaro Zinos-Amaro Reviews issue #27 of Lone Star Stories at TheFix, including “Whatever Shall Grow There, Dear”:

Annamarie’s viewpoint is expertly developed. The way she catches fragments of conversation and meaning from her parent’s arguments but is completely sensitive to the underlying emotional reality of which those arguments are symptomatic rings true. There are numerous images that are beautiful without being ornate, touching and innocent without being sentimental (“Pale late afternoon sunlight filtered through the gauzy white curtains in the living room and made the oiled oak floors glow burnt orange.”) They place us in Annamarie’s world and convey a sense of ethical sensitivity, an almost ennobling naivete, by acting as metaphors for her thoughts and emotions.

The storytelling technique is deceptively simple, and the characters all fully realized. Hoffman centers the tale around Annamarie’s coming-of-age, to great effect, and delivers a knockout ending that bears the bountiful fruits of transformation.

As mentioned when I announced the sale, it’s a special story and a difficult one for me, so it’s extremely gratifying to see someone “get” it, reviewer or otherwise. I would say there’s even a difference between “praise” and when someone “gets” your writing — they extrapolate meaning from the original work that was there in your heart but not obviously stated on the page, painting a picture that resonates with the emotional framework of the story’s origin. It’s a feeling of kinship, and it’s at the core of why I send this stuff out, to test for those precious connections between experiences and minds. Otherwise it could all just stay in the trunk; it’s dangerous, after all, to dissect a part of yourself and spin it into something that you invite people to poke with sticks. But I’m glad this one got out.

Alvaro’s review is worth note because he actually covered the poetry in the issue, too — something that I wish more reviewers would do on The Fix and in spec-fic reviews in general. The poetry in that issue was terrific and well deserving of contemplation and highlight.

Okay, groceries now.