1988, Game Piracy, and the End of an Escapist Era

It’s been awhile since I last wrote for the Escapist, so I’m glad it appears I haven’t forgotten how to do it. “1988: the Golden Age of Game Piracy”, went live today. Many thanks to Paul Reiche for providing insights; in addition to his actual quotes, his perspective pivoted the article away from a first draft that had a rather different tone.

I had intended to post about the article with some “bonus features” in the form of a section that was ultimately removed (rightfully) for being too academic. Maybe I’ll post that another time, since I’d really like to know whether I was properly applying some economic theory.

But instead I’d like to draw your attention to this post from Russ Pitts, “Goodbye is Still Goodbye”.

As you might gather, Russ is moving on from the magazine, and while I’ve worked with a great number of wonderful folk in the last five years, I don’t think any of them would disagree that Russ’s departure in particular marks the end of an era.

My first article for the Escapist back in 2006 was a rather impetuous call to arms for the modern game industry, when the E was quite a different place. It had almost none of its current features and was instead “purely” focused on what would become its “feature” articles; there was a beautiful graphic cover and full spread art for each feature. Even then, in the magazine’s youth, I thought it was a tremendous honor to write for them, and over the years I do believe they remained the best and most thoughtful source of game journalism in the US. They aimed to set a standard of excellence, and Russ was a big part of that success.

Joe Blancato and Jon Martin (both also by now departed) made my introduction to the magazine, but Russ was the consistent editorial steady hand on the wheel throughout — even, interestingly, when he’d moved on to fresher pastures to grow the magazine’s new video content. Where many game magazines have a very well-intentioned but limited tunnel vision view of the industry and the market, Russ had a worldliness that gave the magazine breadth and, I think, greater relevance. He published some tremendous stuff, and as the magazine grew and changed — even when it transitioned away from some of the thoughtfulness and cultural forward-thinking that had first earned it my loyalty as a reader and a writer — I always respected his ability to ride the leading edge of a wave that made new careers even as it destroyed many others.

So, as Leah would say, tip your hat, folks; the times they are a-changin’. There is little doubt that the Escapist will remain a powerhouse in game media for many years to come, and even less doubt that Russ will go on to even greater adventures. But among other things, Inside Job, the quality of life column I wrote from 2007-2008, wouldn’t have existed without him, nor, I’m sure, would many of my feature articles. I am a better writer as a result, and I will always think back on the production of each — even when edits and deadlines plus a “real” job resulted in all-nighter catatonia — with great fondness.

You can keep up with Russ’s rather strange blog here, and peruse records of his own odd internet notoriety.

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